What Are the Most Common Denture Problems in Austin, Texas?

For many people, getting a new set of dentures makes life better in so many ways! Not only are people more easily able to partake in their favorite foods; they’re also able to speak more confidently and enjoy the increased self-esteem that comes with an attractive smile. Of course, that’s not to say that there aren’t some challenges that go along with wearing dentures. There are, in fact, some hurdles that denture wearers must overcome. What follows are some of the most common denture problems that patients from Austin, Texas, and other areas around the country are most likely to experience.

Poorly Fitting Dentures

dental-dentures

One of the most common problems that denture wearers complain about are dentures that don’t fit properly. If you’re brand new at wearing dentures, it’s natural to feel some amount of discomfort for the first few days. But if that discomfort lasts longer than that, it might be because your dentures aren’t fitting correctly. As a result, you might experience friction between your gum tissue and dentures, and that friction can cause sores or infections to form, not to mention pain and discomfort. If you believe that your dentures aren’t fitting as well as they should, schedule an appointment with your dentist right away. In the vast majority of cases, your dentist will be able to adjust your dentures and eliminate the problem altogether.

Dentures that Slip and Move Inside the Mouth

New denture wearers often feel as though their dentures are loose inside their mouth. This is common because the muscles inside the mouth recognize dentures as a foreign object and make an effort to rid the body of this invader! Fortunately, this doesn’t last long, and usually within one or two weeks the new dentures will start to feel more natural. If they don’t, contact your dentist for an adjustment.

If you’ve worn your dentures for a while, they’ve been adjusted by your dentist, but you still have problems with your dentures moving or “slipping” when you speak or eat certain foods, it could be time to try a new denture adhesive or to increase the amount of adhesive you’re using. If you still experience problems, talk to your dentist to find other solutions.

Problems Chewing Food

One of the most common problems with poorly fitting dentures is the way it affects how well you can chew food. If you find that you’ve given up certain foods because they’re just too hard to chew, your dentures aren’t properly fitted. This can also result in your jaw not moving naturally when you chew food, and that in turn can lead to jaw stiffness, soreness and headaches.  You should be able to enjoy whatever food you like with dentures, so if you aren’t able to, it may be time to have them adjusted.

Dentures that Look Unnatural or Make You Look Older

Modern dental technology has come a long way over the past several years, so any good quality pair of modern dentures should look like natural teeth. They shouldn’t be an unnatural shade or too small or too big. 

Most people who have purchased custom-made dentures don’t experience this problem, so think twice before purchasing cheap dentures.

The same holds true for how your dentures make your face look. A good quality pair of dentures that are custom-made for your face should not make you look older. In fact, they should do just the opposite. But if your dentures are too short, they can make the wrinkles around your mouth more obvious and can generally make your face look older. If you’ve had your dentures for a few years and you notice changes in how they feel along with how your face looks, it may be time for a new set of dentures.

Problems Resulting from Poor Oral Hygiene

Just because you wear dentures doesn’t mean you can skip a daily oral hygiene routine. In fact, if you don’t clean your dentures thoroughly or clean your gums properly, the end result can be food particles getting stuck between your dentures and your gums. That can lead to growth of bad bacteria, and that in turn can lead to problems such as gum disease and premature wearing down of your dentures.

Increased Saliva Production

One problem that is especially common for new denture wearers is when dentures cause too much saliva to be produced inside the mouth. This is totally normal. Anytime you introduce your mouth to something new – like a set of dentures, for example – it can trigger your salivary glands to produce saliva. Fortunately, this problem is usually short-lived. Once your mouth becomes accustomed to your dentures, your saliva production will return to normal – typically within just a few days after starting to wear your new appliance.

Difficulty Speaking Clearly

One of the most common problems with poorly fitting dentures is the way it affects how well you can chew food. If you find that you’ve given up certain foods because they’re just too hard to chew, your dentures aren’t properly fitted. This can also result in your jaw not moving naturally when you chew food, and that in turn can lead to jaw stiffness, soreness and headaches.  You should be able to enjoy whatever food you like with dentures, so if you aren’t able to, it may be time to have them adjusted.

Getting Used to Your Dentures

Getting a new set of dentures, or starting to wear dentures for the first time, always brings some challenges. It takes your body time to adapt to your new appliance. For some people, that adjustment period is a few days, while for others it may take a week or two. During that time period, it’s common to experience some of the problems we’ve discussed in this article. Many of these issues will go away once you become accustomed to your new dental appliance, while others may require a trip back to the dentist for an adjustment. To find out more about some of the most common denture problems and how to resolve them, contact your Austin, Texas dentist today

We will be out of the office to spend time with our loved ones for the holiday during the week of December 21 - December 25. We will be back in the office to help our wonderful patients on Monday, December 28.

CLOSE
Scroll to Top